Brocher Foundation award

On the ethical, legal & social implications of new biosecurity technologies as they relate to migrants and the geography of biological citizenship

New biosecurity technologies that employ genetic screening and associated biomedical innovations in body-scanning and personalized medicine are transforming the ways in which transnational migration is governed around the world.  A notable divide is thereby opening up between privileged transnational migrants who are enfranchised as globally mobile biological citizens and a diverse set of disenfranchised others—refugees, asylum seekers, and guest workers—for whom the use of genetic screening and other biosecurity technologies imposes new personal costs, privacy concerns and risks of biological sub-citizenship and exclusion.

Status of Research or Work: 
Ongoing
Research Type: